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13422459_10154572674312841_6165530650647232293_oI love capturing the translucency of light in my paintings, but it’s even easier when working with wax and paper. The most dramatic way I’ve found to show this off is with my wax scrolls.

There are just a few spots left in my last Colorful Wax Scrolls class of the year! Join me on Saturday, July 15, from 10 am – 4 pm in my private Portland, Oregon studio.

Join me to create panels of paper and wax that are thin enough for natural light to penetrate, filling your space with energy and movement. In using paper we’ll trade some durability for dynamism, but wait until you see the result! If you keep them indoors they will last for many years, but you can still decorate your garden with them on special occasions.

View class examples and register here for my class in Portland: http://lindarobertsonarts.com/books/workshops/scrolls.html

If you can’t come to my studio class, try the online version here:
http://www.RobertsonWorkshops.com

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Linda Robertson is a painter and the author of the Embracing Encaustic book series. She offers live encaustic workshops in her Portland, Oregon studio as well as online encaustic classes.

So that’s it for another Wax Week! I only do these 5 day intensive classes once or twice a year and it’s always exciting for me to watch such an enthusiastic community of artists bound by wax. I usually have students from several states and this session was no different except that several of them could claim many states as their home since they happened to be in transition. No matter, everyone came with an open mind, an open heart and kind words for their fellow artists.

Dorothy, Sandy and Mary sharing a laugh

Dorothy, Sandy and Mary sharing a laugh

A bird theme seemed to appear pretty quickly! This is by Sandy.

A bird theme seemed to appear pretty quickly! This is by Sandy.

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Mary with her hummingbirds

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Sandy’s hummingbirds

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Dorothy’s owl

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Leslie, Dorothy and Sandy adding texture to their work

Shannon's texture tools getting a workout!

Shannon’s texture tools getting a workout!

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Textured landscape by Leslie

Shannon's beautiful work with texture

It’s safe to say that Shannon especially loved adding texture!

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Sandy fusing with the heat gun

Lunch under the trees

Lunch under the trees

Shannon is back to work on image transfers. What a change in mood!

Shannon is back to work on image transfers. What a change in mood!

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Mary’s Garden

Sandy's collage

Sandy’s collage

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A toast to end a wonderful week!

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Thanks Sandy, Mary, Shannon, Dorothy and Leslie for an exciting week.

New techniques learned, exciting art created and new friendships formed. I love to see everyone swapping contact info before they leave. I can’t wait to see what you come up with next!

I’m planning my Wax Week dates for 2015 now! If you’re interested in joining us please sign up for my free newsletter to be notified when dates are finalized. I hope to see you in Portland soon!

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Linda Robertson offers live encaustic workshops in her Portland, Oregon studio as well as online encaustic classes at RobertsonWorkshops.com.

Colorful Wax ScrollsWhen Fred Swan and I had our show together People’s Art gallery a couple of years ago we looked at those big beautiful windows with the light streaming in and knew something special was going to happen there.

After some discussion about what would best fill that space we were intrigued by the idea of wax scrolls. We worked independently on them, then brought our creations together as an installation in that front window. Having so many panels of paper and wax with that delicate natural light penetrating them filled the space with energy and movement. It was beautiful! People were very excited about the feel and scent of these art works, as well as their visual appeal.

Since that show I’ve made (a lot!) more scrolls and I’ve come up with new ways to add color and patterns to the paper, cut outs to be removed and reattached and a new way to hang them. It’s such a relaxing and meditative process, but it also gives you the instant satisfaction of making a 5 foot long piece of art in a day! If you’d like to try this yourself come see me in my Portland, Oregon studio this Saturday, 9/27. There are just a few spots left in this class and it won’t be offered again until next summer. If you’re not in the area join my mailing list to be notified when my online class for this is ready! I’m making big plans for that right now…

Here's Fred on the ladder installing one of the panels at our show

Here’s Fred on the ladder installing one of the panels at our show

This is the view of our installation from inside the gallery.

This is the view of our installation from inside the gallery.

Perparing paper scrolls

Dorothy working on her scroll in one of my recent classes

New designs

Here’s a set of scrolls I made recently with several new techniques

Lit scrollsWax Scrolls

Online encaustic classes at RobertsonWorkshops.com

Online encaustic classes at RobertsonWorkshops.com

Great news! My online encaustic classes are now available by the class or by the lesson, allowing you to purchase exactly what you need. A few lessons are as little as $5 and each class page has at least one free bonus video. 

Each page has a free excerpt from the class plus at least one free bonus video! Check them out here: http://www.RobertsonWorkshops.com/

Are you new to encaustic? Not a problem! You should know that encaustic is one of the oldest forms of painting, with paint made from pure pigment mixed with beeswax and resin. The mixture is applied hot, and then reheated to fuse the layers together. It’s one of the most forgiving mediums available, allowing you to “undo” virtually anything, giving you the freedom to be fearless and let your creativity flow. My online encaustic classes will get you started working in this beautiful and unique medium in no time.

Online encaustic classes at RobertsonWorkshops.com

Online Encaustic & Shellac class at RobertsonWorkshops.com

I’m so thankful to be a part of this blog hop, and excited to see how everyone creates their own unique art using the materials in the new Linda Robertson Encaustic Set from Enkaustikos! (By the way, some of you may know me as Linda Womack, but it’s Linda Robertson now so please help me spread the word if you would be so kind…)

This set includes lots of encaustic paint and medium in my favorite colors, 4 brushes, a pot of cleaning wax, an 8 x 10 cradled panel, 3 essential tools, a stencil from StencilGirl Products, a pastel from PanPastel Colors and three of my online lessons showing how to use all of the materials together. Here’s a little video to tell you what it’s all about:

01-materialsBTW, if you are brand new to encaustic you might want to start with my free video overview about encaustic materials (scroll down to “Extra Features”).

I like to practice what I preach in my classes that no board is unsalvageable, especially in encaustic, but this one was NOT looking good. It had colors that didn’t go together and was the product of a demo I did for a very large crowd in Santa Fe last year so it’s safe to say that it was far more spontaneous than planned.

The beauty of salvaging something is that you have those beautiful colors that come through the background and tend to be wonderful surprises.

Many artists who work with wax and stencils together try to get very precise imagery but that’s not always the goal. I decided to do something very loose on this one. This stencil, called Eddy Rose, is from StencilGirl, and was designed by Mary Beth Shaw.

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To get this effect I painted the wax through the stencil as usual, but instead of fusing the stencil in place I pulled it up first and then fused it to let the pattern flow with the wax. The result was beautiful!

You can really see the difference in the center photo above, where the top part of the board is fused and the bottom portion is not. I repeated this a couple of times alternating between Zinc White and Super Gold Pearl paint from Enkaustikos which are both included in my set.

03-carve Read the rest of this entry »

When you mix colors do you tend to make nothing but mud? There’s a class for that! (and a quick tip below…)

On June 19 from 6 – 9 pm I’m hosting guest instructor and color expert Kimberly Kent in my Portland, Oregon studio to help you expand your painting palette while you develop your color sensibility.

Learn to mix, glaze and see color better. The exercises and techniques in this class will give you new tools for understanding how to mix just the color you need. You’ll work in encaustic paint in this class, but these concepts can be applied to color mixing in any medium. Find out more about my classes or register here.

How to Avoid Making Mud

Here’s a great example of the tips you’ll learn in this class: To avoid making mud, mix two primaries first. Once you get as close as you can to your desired color add the third primary. For example, mix yellow and blue to make green, then a touch of red to get the green you want. Just a few tips like this will have you mixing colors like a pro!

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Linda Womack offers encaustic workshops in her Portland, Oregon studio as well as online encaustic classes at RobertsonWorkshops.com.

I’ve finally had time to put together some preview videos for our online encaustic classes at RobertsonWorkshops.com. Take a peek:

That’s right, if you can’t get to my classes in Oregon I’ll come to you online! View my class listings and more free videos at RobertsonWorkshops.com.

Songs Never Cease, 36 x 48, installed at Opus VII Gallery

I love a good art blog and Nancy Natale has got one. Nancy is a visual artist who works in several types of media including encaustic. We only see each other once a year or so at the International Encaustic Conference in Provincetown, but we keep up with each other through email, blogs and FaceBook. Last year she even bought one of my paintings at the conference.

Recently Nancy put out a call for an online exhibit called Art & Music, looking for art influenced by music and I’m happy to have my work included in the show. While choosing which piece to submit I started looking at my art in a new light which I think is a good indication of a strong curatorial theme. The show turned into a fascinating look at several artists work I hadn’t seen before, as well as a new view of my own work.

Here’s how Nancy introduced the show: “Listening to music while making art is a common practice in the studio. All that silence of solitude needs breaking up with melody and rhythm. It keeps us company, gets us singing and dancing, influences our moods and creeps into our art.”

I hope you’ll view the show and then take a look at your work in a new light. Does music influence your art?

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Linda Robertson offers encaustic workshops in her Portland, Oregon studio as well as online encaustic classes at RobertsonWorkshops.com.

Those of you who read my blog on a regular basis know all about my previous visits to the John Campbell Folk School, so I won’t revisit the basics again. Instead I’ll focus on this amazing group of students brought together by my workshop there a few weeks ago. Wow, did we have fun! I’ve got several photos here for you to get an idea of how the workshop unfolded, and what wonderful friendships were forged.

captionDru and Louise had very different styles of working, but had a great time working together. Louise arrived in her big truck with just about everything under the sun so when we were missing something everyone asked, “Does Louise have it?” and she usually did. Thank goodness!

captionAnne and Susan taught wood turning instructor Jim about the basics of encaustic. Jim, along with several other instructors and students from other classes, stopped by to see what all the fuss was about and left with a copy of my book Embracing Encaustic in tow to get started at home.

Here is the whole class on the last day along with some of their favorite work. The photo was taken by our wonderful studio assistant Susi Hall who managed to avoid my camera!

This group was made up of extraordinary experimenters who tried hard to find new approaches to use with their wax. Check out some of their work:

Stacey made this wonderful piece with pins running through balls of wax that were scraped off of other paintings. It's a wonderful reminder that everything doesn't need to be flat!

Lynn brought in a ceramic panel that was bisque fired and added transparent wax to enhance the surface.

Ruth made this wonderful piece look like leather by combining wax, shellac and fabric.

Rodney is vision impaired and contacted me about it before class. I figured out that because I feel the wax as much as I look at it that we should be able to find a way for him to work in the medium. We did! This image uses an image transfer for the figures and the rest was done with a smaller paint brush and his little flashlight to help him see the brush detail as he painted. Nicely done!

Dru made this piece with a hand colored photograph glued to the board then covered with clear medium. I showed her how to use wax crayons and PanPastels on top of the wax for delicate surface details. Dru sold this piece to a student from another class during our show at the end of the week.

Anne worked with cigar boxes as bases for several of her pieces and come up with some interesting designs, a few of which looked like shrines.

We had a critique at the end of class where everyone was able to show off their favorite work in private before it went to the exhibit.

During class I mentioned that my dog, Sadie, needs surgery and I was very worried about her. Someone found a photo of her in my collage materials and everyone worked together on this painting of Sadie, wishing her a speedy recovery. It was such a sweet gesture that they made me cry. Thanks everyone!

The two funniest comments from the week:

1. That looks like a hamhock!

2. That girl ‘aint right.

Both said with a smile, and both well received. Yes, it was an extraordinary group, and it was my pleasure to be a part of it. 🙂

Many artists already use the excellent forum hosted by R&F Paints, but now we have a new blog to look forward to in 2009 as well. Below is a great video they posted recently showing how they make paint and pigment sticks, or visit their new blog.

In case you can’t get to Portland to see Andrea Schwartz-Feit’s encaustic show at Butters Gallery (closing Dec. 20), here’s a taste of it through an excellent interview by Eva Lake.

It’s always fascinating to me to hear an artist talk about their work and feel the enthusiasm they have for their subjects, but it’s something I rarely get to experience. Here’s a pretty good substitute!

You can find many more interviews on Eva’s blog or on KBOO radio’s Art Focus program Enjoy!

Join me at 23 Sandy Gallery on February 7, 2009 for Working in Wax. This lecture will be a rich visual introduction to the history, tools and techniques of encaustic painting, along with an overview of contemporary artists working in this ancient medium. I’ll share images of several of my paintings as they were being created, showing some of the steps involved in building up the layers of wax and other media.

There will also be a screening of Sister Bee, a lyrical and beautiful documentary about six women beekeepers who encounter startling beauty and spiritual truth in their work with honeybees (Running time 30 minutes). Tickets are $10 and are available in my studio or by mail. Limited to 25 people.

Wow, what a busy weekend! We had a great book release party on Friday for Embracing Encaustic: Learning to Paint with Beeswax and lots of friends came by to wish us well. If you couldn’t make ti to the party here in Portland, here’s a taste of the fun.

My husband Bill was instrumental in getting this book to press so it was a real family celebration. We had books for sale at the party but they will be available to everyone else online by June 15. First we have the really BIG party at the National Encaustic Conference next week near Boston. I plan to blog about the conference most days I’m there, so watch this space for updates from the road. Read the rest of this entry »

We had our local International Encaustic Artists (IEA) meeting last night as the temperature reached almost 100 degrees. This is unusual for Portland and even stranger because I still have sweat pants in the wash from when I was so cold a couple of weeks ago!

Karl with his new work

We welcomed a new member, Karl, and enjoyed the work he shared with us. Judy Wise and Melinda Fellini gave us the scoop on the recent IEA retreat in Carmel while we tried to cool down with a nice beverage. I also shared the first copies of my book, Embracing Encaustic, which arrived the day before. Below is guest artist Andrea Benson reviewing her work in the book.

Andrea reviews her work in Embracing Encaustic

I have a few advance copies, but the bulk of the books have yet to arrive. It will officially debut at the National Encaustic Conference in Massachusetts on June 8, and by June 15 it will be available for purchase at www.embracingencaustic.com.

Our demo this month was by Susan Freedman who has a new stencil cutting tool we all wanted to try out. It’s made by Fiskars and makes cutting stencils with paper a snap! We we’re all duly impressed by how easy and accurate it is. I think what she had is an older version of the Ultra Shapexpress. It’s around $20 and from what I saw it will be worth every penny.

We were also delivering our work for the show Jim Talt arranged in Newberg next month at the Newberg Gallery (more on that soon!), so that spawned various impromptu critiques as the night wore on…

Read the rest of this entry »

As many of you already know, I’m participating in The Diptych Project: A Collaboration in Wax, which matched 36 artists into pairs to work collaboratively on 2 encaustic paintings. The objective was for each pair of artists to make two diptychs (a diptych is work made up of two panels). In January I posted an image of my first panel, but now both sets are done!

Here’s my panel for the Oregon show, with the full diptych below.

Linda’s OR diptych

My half of the Growing Pains panel, with the complete work below.

diptych - both panels

Growing Pains (Diptych), 24″ x 38″, Encaustic, wood, tissue on wood panel. (Left panel: Linda Womack. Right panel: Sara Ameigh)

I was paired with Sara Ameigh and her panel is on the right. Her work is so different from mine that I had a tough time figuring out what to do on my half. I knew my side would have to be simple and calm to balance her side, but I couldn’t decide what to do. After 3 months of consideration my side came together in just three days. (Three very longs day, mind you!) and I’m happy with the result.

I extended the black line from her panel into mine and echoed the orange color and the round shapes in her work with the image of the flower buds in mine. It is titled Growing Pains because that relates to my botanical image trying to exist within the chaos that surrounds it, but it also reflects the process Sara and I had to go through to make a collaborative work like this. It’s pretty tough to work collaboratively when you can never be in the same room! Our finished work for the Maine show is below.

Maine Diptych

What Lies Beneath (Diptych), 24″ x 38″, Encaustic, wood, tissue, dried leaf, on wood panel. (Left panel: Sara Ameigh. Right panel: Linda Womack.)

The completed diptychs will be debut next week Friday (April 4) in Portland, ME and Portland, OR. The east coast exhibit will be held at Whitney Art Works in Portland, Maine, while the west coast works will be shown at Brian Marki Fine Art in Portland, Oregon. Each artist’s work will also be exhibited as a part of this year’s 2008 National Encaustic Conference in Massachusetts this June. (To see posts about the 2007 conference go here.)

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RobertsonWorkshops.com online video classes bring Linda Robertson, an art teacher with international experience, right into your studio. Work at your own pace and watch the videos as many times as you want for a whole year.

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My Books: Embracing Encaustic Series

There are now two books under the Embracing Encaustic title, Learning to Paint with Beeswax and the new title Advanced Techniques for Mixing Media, each focusing on specific encaustic techniques. Between the two books there are a total of 70 artists who share their work, reveal their personal painting methods and explain why they are compelled to make the work they do.Find out more and purchase them online here.

Embracing Encaustic: Learning to Paint with Beeswax
By Linda Robertson

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