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I’m thrilled to make my big announcement — my new video workshops are now available online at RobertsonWorkshops.com!

Our online video classes bring an art teacher with international experience right into your studio. Work at your own pace, get personalized instruction, and interact with a community of like-minded artists. Best of all, every class is just $49 US with six months of access to videos and the class community.

I’ve been teaching in-person in my studio and around the country for years, but availability has always been limited to a handful of students per class. At the same time, so many of you have expressed interest in my workshops over the years with the regret that you live too far away to join me. To solve both of these problems my husband Bill and I decided to offer video classes, delivered online.

Here’s How it Works

  • All videos are available immediately so you can work at your own pace.
  • Your purchase gives you six months of access to the videos starting the moment you purchase the class.
  • The class includes an online forum where you can chat with the instructor and other students, share photos of your work in progress and post finished work.
  • The instructor will answer forum questions several times daily for the first 7 days of each month.
  • You’ll also benefit from discussions with all of the other students throughout the duration of the class.

For those of you who haven’t tried encaustic painting before the new web site even includes a free video on how to set up your own encaustic studio.

Join our mailing list to be notified when new classes are added (click link and look in right column).

Can you help me spread the word?

Please forward this link to a friend or two who you think might be interested. I’ve announced this on FaceBook and Twitter recently too, so if you see those posts please “like” them or retweet. Many thanks…

This encaustic conference event attracts artists all over the world and this year there were 35 states in the US represented as well as artists traveling from Canada, England, Mexico, Brazil, Spain New Zealand. The conference was held in Provincetown this year which allowed for some changes to the format and new venues for post conference workshops.  I think Joanne found an excellent partner in working with Truro Center for the Arts at Castle Hill and its Executive Director, Cherie Mittenthal, who was wonderful to work with.

PROVINCETOWN


Our first night in P-town was spent at the Lobster Pot with Mike and Kathryn from Enkaustikos, Kimberly and Judy, my buddies from Portland. This was a great restaurant, not to be missed! They even had a nice steak for me (I’m allergic to seafood). Other restaurants we really enjoyed were The Squealing Pig, Bubalas, and the Portuguese Bakery which had real Malasadas like I get in Hawaii!

We managed to fit is several outings to the surrounding areas and I’m so glad we took the time to do it. Provincetown has so much to offer!

  

This is the view from the top of the 252 foot tall Pilgrim Monument in the middle of town. The web site  refers to the climb as a “heart-healthy walk to the top on 116 steps and 60 ramps,” which by the way is totally worth it.


We booked a dune tour which took us by the famous “dune shacks,” the simple beach cabins of numerous artists and writers during the past century. You can see one here in the upper left area of the photo. Below are cranberry bogs surrounded by sand dunes. It’s gorgeous out there!

I also enjoyed a sunset cruise on the last night, relaxing in the warm breeze. The Pilgrim Monument is way off in the distance.

GALLERIES


On Friday night we made our way to the several openings at galleries that were showing encaustic work in conjunction with the conference.


Later we discovered the wonderful Galeria Cubana, which didn’t have encaustic work but did have some fine paintings we enjoyed very much.

CONFERENCE

The conference itself was good again this year, with so many wonderful events going by almost in a blur. I’m including some photos below to give you a flavor of the event.


This year I was on a panel called Mastering Media, a discussion about marketing the art we’re all working so hard to make. I spoke about getting my book, Embracing Encaustic, from and idea into reality and many of the successes and bumps along the way. The audience seemed to really like hearing about all the craziness that went on behind the scenes. My fellow panelists were (from left) Jeff Schaller, Nancy Natale, me,  Cherie Mittenthal and moderator Joanne Mattera. Thanks to Corina Alvarezdelugo for allowing me to use her photo here.


This was our little posse for the weekend with Kimberly Kent, Judy Wise and Jess Greene.

Lisa Pressman gave a wonderful lecture with a behind the scenes look at several encaustic studios.

Greg Wright had the crowd cheering for his demonstration of working with shellac, inks and powders to make patterned effects. “Do you want to go a few minutes more?” he asked…

Jackie Battenfield, author of the excellent book, The Artist’s Guide: How to Make a Living Doing What you Love, was our keynote speaker. She got the crowd all revved up and organized in thinking about what we should be thinking about next in our careers.

Here’s part of my work in the hotel fair, a new addition to the conference line up. I’ll bring more next time, now that I see how much we all love to shop!


David A. Clark went all out with new work just for the hotel fair and a true installation style. Brilliant!

POST CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS

There so much to do before, during and after a class, especially one that you travel to teach. Because of that many teachers will offer to assist a colleague on a pay it forward type of arrangement as I did this year.


I was the assistant for Charyl Weissbach’s Mainly Metals class at Castle Hill during the post-conference workshops. Charyl taught her students how to work with most things metallic, from paint to powder, pigment sticks and even metal leaf. Charyl was the assistant for my friend Kimberly’s class last year (see below).

  

Kimberly Kent had an adventurous class again this year with plein air painting in encaustic. See the little camp stoves and torches they are using? It’s not for the faint of heart, but if you’re up for traveling with your wax it will allow you to paint directly from nature.


And that’s a wrap for this post on the 5th International Encaustic Conference. Nancy Natale and Lynette Haggard surprised Joanne with two huge cakes and a card signed by all to thank her for her efforts in making each conference so special. Nancy is pictured here with Cherie and Joanne on the right, wearing special hats for the occasion.

First, let me warn you that I’m not even close to done with blogging on the conference. I had to take a break because It was time to make Embracing Encaustic available to purchase online and I was inundated with orders. Nope, not in any way complaining, just a little overwhelmed. In just the first two days I mailed 150 books to 5 countries! Thanks so much for this amazing support. But back to the conference…

One of my favorite parts about the encaustic conference is the chance to meet, face-to-face, so many of my colleagues who I usually only communicate with via email. I love my email but there’s no replacement for real human interaction. I was also able to meet lots of new friends, not only during the sessions I attended during the conference, but after hours when we had time to digest and discuss what we experienced during the day. Here are a few photographs of those events.

Mary Farmer & Kimberly Kent (left), Catherine Nash and my husband Bill Womack

An impromptu discussion outside of the Miles Conrad workshop

Dinner with Joanne Mattera and friends (left), Sheary Suiter joined us on the ferry to Boston

Lobster dinner with the girls (left)…and the boys. Bill again and Ted Loomis.

It’s easy to get involved in the after hours discussions at the conference. If you are in the main building when the last session lets out just hang around for a few minutes and inevitably someone will call out, “Who wants dinner?” Don’t be shy. If no one else is asking you can start up a group. Word travels fast since we all want more time to get to know one another in our short weekend in Beverly. You’ll have new BFF’s in no time.

View all of my posts about the National Encaustic Conference here

Wow, what a day! The number of images I have from this day alone is a testament to all how many events were happening one after another. Welcome to the Second National Encaustic Conference (virtual edition)!

Vendor Room

Bill and I went on duty as vendors as soon as registration opened at 11:00 am. We were at one of several tables in the room where vendors were selling paint, panels, books and services. Many companies are offering terrific show specials so I found time to do a little shopping. The energy in the room was amazing and by the end of the day we had already sold 2/3 of the books we brought for the whole conference!

Julie Shaw Lutts – 3D Assemblage

Julie Shaw Lutts offered the first demo of the conference, so conference founder Joanne Mattera took a few minutes at the beginning of her talk to thank everyone and make a few announcements, but then it was time to play.

Julie showed us how she makes her thought provoking assemblages with images and found objects. She often glues inkjet prints to flat wood bases then uses a jigsaw to cut them into the desired shape, then uses epoxy or wood glue to attach them to her boxes. One thing I found interesting is that she has three hot plates going at once, one each for heating paint, warming tools, and for warming the boxes and objects before waxing them.

Julie prints images onto mulberry paper instead of the tissue paper I use because it gives her the same effect of the paper disappearing into the wax leaving just the image visible, but she can feed the paper right through her inkjet printer without attaching it to another backing before hand. Gotta try it!

Eileen Goldenberg – The Tea House Project

I have been familiar with Eileen Goldenberg’s Tea House Project since she described to to me over a very cheap bottle of wine at last year’s IEA Retreat, but I was really looking forward to getting more information on how the project progressed and better yet, how Eileen secured grant money to make many of the paintings. First she told us a little about grant writing in general then offered a few specifics on how she obtained her funding. It was a grant from the San Fransisco Arts Commission based on her proposal to create work inspired by a book by Ellis Avery called The Tea House Fire. Her proposal included teaching under served populations about the history of encaustic painting and several other outreach activities.

Eileen then showed slides of distinctive points in the progression of this series, which ultimately ended with 255 variations on her theme. Seeing her progression through all the stages of these paintings made me very aware of the fact that I don’t investigate my images very deeply, often trying one thing then flitting on to another. Recently I’ve been feeling the need to take one general thought or theme and try many variations before moving on, allowing my brain and body to fully investigate what it might naturally evolve into. I guarantee you I will NOT make it to 255!

On the Edge – Show Opening

Next we headed over to the Montserrat 301 gallery for the opening of “On The Edge” curated by Laura Moriarty who oversees the R&F Gallery in New York. Honestly, the show was so packed that we could barely see the art, as you’ll see from my photos. I hope to go back later in the week to give this fine work my full attention. Joanne Mattera gave out several awards, and prizes included copies of my book Embracing Encaustic.

Norman LaLiberte – Show Opening

I know, it’s hard to believe there’s more, but we’re not even close to done (and my feet were screaming by now).

Norman LaLiberte signing a poster for Kimberly Kent

Last year I had work in the Hot Stuff show at the conference and it was purchased the night of the opening by Norman LaLiberte. I hate to admit it, but at the time I had no idea what an honor it was to have my work in his collection. Since then Norman and I have corresponded a few times and he was generous enough to share his work with me through several posters and museum catalogs he sent me, along with wonderful hand typed letters. Tonight I got to see it all in person at his solo show in one of the galleries on the Montsertat school grounds. It is a beautiful show and I was pleased to be able to congratulate Norman in person. He’s quite a character and drew loads of adoring fans.

Kay WalkingStick – Keynote Address

Kay WalkingStickLast but nowhere near least, was the excellent keynote address by Kay WalkingStick. Kay has had over 30 solo shows, nine of them in museums. The first was in 1969; the most recent was in 2007 at the June Kelly Gallery in New York City. She has been an active part of the renaissance of Native American fine art in the US.

Tonight she shared with us a retrospective of her work from the 1970’s forward, talking in detail about her interest in symbology and her Native American roots. She emphasized that the medium needs to serve the message and not the other way around, which is why she work with wax, oil, acrylic or gouache depending on what’s appropriate to the piece. She was also adamant that everything in your paintings should be there for a reason.

I’ll be taking a full day workshop with her on Monday so I’ll have a lot more to share then. Let me just say that after her talk it’s clear to me that I’m very lucky to have been accepted into her workshop where I expect her to challenge me in just the way I need right now. I’m very excited to talk with her one-on-one about my work. Oh yeah, and a bit nervous!

We’re Still Dancing/Taos Variation, 2006, oil/panel, 32″ x 64″

 

Conference DemoThe Second National Encaustic Painting Conference will take place at Montserrat College of Art, June 6-8, 2008. Montserrat is in Beverly, Massachusetts, a coastal town north of Boston.

Last year there were 140 of us from around the country (and beyond!) who attended panels, demonstrations, talks, an art opening (Hot Stuff, juried by Zola Solamente of Arden Gallery in Boston), informal gallery discussions, and plenty of networking. My blog posts provide a good overview of the event. This year they expect the conference numbers to double, so if you are interested in attending you should make your decision as soon as possible.

National Encaustic Conference postcard

I’m also pleased to announce that Joanne Mattera (author of The Art of Encaustic Painting) has asked me to participate in the conference by doing 2 demonstrations and a book signing for Embracing Encaustic: Learning to paint with beeswax.
Altering the Path, 12″ x 15″, encaustic on panelMy demonstration will be on Painting with Masks and Stencils to Develop the Image where I will reveal some of my favorite stenciling and masking techniques for protecting one part of the canvas while working on another. I use ordinary household materials to make marks and textures with my wax to form lines, shapes and imagery. For example, in the work shown here the shape of the bird was cut out of cheesecloth which was then used to mask the layers below as the white wax was applied, giving the piece much more depth than if I simply painted a bird. Using masks offers a simple way to develop striking forms using nothing but wax. I’ll also have a binder with images from many other artists that will also include notes on how they use masks and stencils in interesting ways. It’s my low-tech answer to not being able to do a slide show AND a demo in the same hour. My demo will be offered twice, in both the Saturday and Sunday conference roster. I hope to see you there!

My friend Brenda Boyd was nice enough to send me a great link I’d like to share. I purchased the September/October issue of Fiber Arts Magazine when it first came out because my friend Daniella Woolf was profiled in it along with several other encaustic artists. What I didn’t realize is that you can sneak a peek into it online (or order this terrific issue for just $7): http://www.fiberarts.com/back_issues/09_07/sampling.asp

 

Lorraine Glessner, Seed, 12 x 12 inches

Hot Stuff show openingThe artist profiled online, Lorraine Glessner, does stunning work as shown above. She was part of the Hot Stuff exhibit I was in at the National Encaustic Conference last year and I can attest that her work is even more beautiful in person.

This year’s conference takes place in early June and I was honored that Joanne Mattera asked me to do a demonstration on painting with masks and hold a book signing. I’ll post more on that later. Maybe I’ll see you there!

Hot StuffThis virtual gallery is for all of those artists not able to attend the First National Encaustic Conference and accompanying gallery show, Hot Stuff.

The range of the work was impressive, with everything from works on paper to sculpture represented, including traditional and experiments styles. I attended the show twice and still didn’t get enough time with these amazing pieces of art! Enjoy.

** To see more posts about the 2007 conference go here. **

1b Gwen Plunkett 3 5 8 Alexandre Masino 19 20 21a 23 Lissa Rankin 25 27 Mari Marks Linda Womack, Remiains of the Earth, 12 x 12 inches Miles Conrad, Explorer, Encaustic, Rubber Bands, Wire on Panel Daniella Woolf, Spina 30, 30 x 30 inches, sewn paper encaustic Ed Angell, Homage to M.L., 12″ X 12″ X 4 3/4 inches, Beeswax and Lead Debra Ramsay, Alone Together, 24 x 24 inces, encaustic and eggshell inlay on birch panel Debra Ramsay, Measuring Parallels #7, 24 x 24 inches, encaustic and eggshell inlay on birch panel Jeff Schaller, Closed, 24 x 24 inches, encaustic Jeff Schaller, Flashbulbs, 24 x 24 inches, encaustic Kristin Swenson-Lintault, Vital, 12 x 12 inches, Encaustic, oil stick, string on Masonite Lorraine Glessner, Seed, 12 x 12 inches Lorraine Glessner, Refraction, 12 x 12 inches David Hazlett, Lime Wedge, 9 1/2 x 10 1/2 inches Lorrie Fredette, Pores, 6 x 3″, encaustic and interfacing Lorrie Fredette, Preservation #2 & #3, 23 x 24 X 6, encaustic and interfacing Diana Gonzales-Gandolfi Sandra Quinn Alexandre Masino, Conquis par cette lumi, Encaustic on board, 16″ x 23″ Alexandre Masino, Culte diurne, Encaustic on board, 16″ x 23″ Julie Shaw Lutts, Journey, 12″ x 12″ on wood panel Kim Bernard, Nautilus, encaustic on terra cotta, 3” x 15” x 15″ Kim Bernard, Asclepias Scattered, encaustic on terra cotta, 3” x 10” x 20”

Please note: I lost my notes with the artists and titles so I’m adding in the info for what I have, numbering the rest of the works (view the number or artist’s name by moving your cursor the image). Also, I wasn’t able to photograph all of the work, so if you were represented in the show and I’ve missed yours (or ended up with a bad photo!) please send me an image and I’ll add it here. If your work is here and you’d like me to post the details, please send them to me along with the number it goes with.

Hot Stuff show opening

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My Books: Embracing Encaustic Series

There are now two books under the Embracing Encaustic title, Learning to Paint with Beeswax and the new title Advanced Techniques for Mixing Media, each focusing on specific encaustic techniques. Between the two books there are a total of 70 artists who share their work, reveal their personal painting methods and explain why they are compelled to make the work they do.Find out more and purchase them online here.

Embracing Encaustic: Learning to Paint with Beeswax
By Linda Robertson

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