You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘beeswax’ tag.

So that’s it for another Wax Week! I only do these 5 day intensive classes once or twice a year and it’s always exciting for me to watch such an enthusiastic community of artists bound by wax. I usually have students from several states and this session was no different except that several of them could claim many states as their home since they happened to be in transition. No matter, everyone came with an open mind, an open heart and kind words for their fellow artists.

Dorothy, Sandy and Mary sharing a laugh

Dorothy, Sandy and Mary sharing a laugh

A bird theme seemed to appear pretty quickly! This is by Sandy.

A bird theme seemed to appear pretty quickly! This is by Sandy.

ww-art-Mary-birds

Mary with her hummingbirds

ww-art-sandy-hummingbird

Sandy’s hummingbirds

ww-art-dorothy-owl

Dorothy’s owl

cls_ww-process1

Leslie, Dorothy and Sandy adding texture to their work

Shannon's texture tools getting a workout!

Shannon’s texture tools getting a workout!

ww-art-leslie-texture

Textured landscape by Leslie

Shannon's beautiful work with texture

It’s safe to say that Shannon especially loved adding texture!

cls_ww-process4-sandy

Sandy fusing with the heat gun

Lunch under the trees

Lunch under the trees

Shannon is back to work on image transfers. What a change in mood!

Shannon is back to work on image transfers. What a change in mood!

ww-art-mary-garden

Mary’s Garden

Sandy's collage

Sandy’s collage

cls_ww-wine2

A toast to end a wonderful week!

cls_ww-group

Thanks Sandy, Mary, Shannon, Dorothy and Leslie for an exciting week.

New techniques learned, exciting art created and new friendships formed. I love to see everyone swapping contact info before they leave. I can’t wait to see what you come up with next!

I’m planning my Wax Week dates for 2015 now! If you’re interested in joining us please sign up for my free newsletter to be notified when dates are finalized. I hope to see you in Portland soon!

______________________________________

Linda Robertson offers live encaustic workshops in her Portland, Oregon studio as well as online encaustic classes at RobertsonWorkshops.com.

Advertisements

I’m so thankful to be a part of this blog hop, and excited to see how everyone creates their own unique art using the materials in the new Linda Robertson Encaustic Set from Enkaustikos! (By the way, some of you may know me as Linda Womack, but it’s Linda Robertson now so please help me spread the word if you would be so kind…)

This set includes lots of encaustic paint and medium in my favorite colors, 4 brushes, a pot of cleaning wax, an 8 x 10 cradled panel, 3 essential tools, a stencil from StencilGirl Products, a pastel from PanPastel Colors and three of my online lessons showing how to use all of the materials together. Here’s a little video to tell you what it’s all about:

01-materialsBTW, if you are brand new to encaustic you might want to start with my free video overview about encaustic materials (scroll down to “Extra Features”).

I like to practice what I preach in my classes that no board is unsalvageable, especially in encaustic, but this one was NOT looking good. It had colors that didn’t go together and was the product of a demo I did for a very large crowd in Santa Fe last year so it’s safe to say that it was far more spontaneous than planned.

The beauty of salvaging something is that you have those beautiful colors that come through the background and tend to be wonderful surprises.

Many artists who work with wax and stencils together try to get very precise imagery but that’s not always the goal. I decided to do something very loose on this one. This stencil, called Eddy Rose, is from StencilGirl, and was designed by Mary Beth Shaw.

02-background

To get this effect I painted the wax through the stencil as usual, but instead of fusing the stencil in place I pulled it up first and then fused it to let the pattern flow with the wax. The result was beautiful!

You can really see the difference in the center photo above, where the top part of the board is fused and the bottom portion is not. I repeated this a couple of times alternating between Zinc White and Super Gold Pearl paint from Enkaustikos which are both included in my set.

03-carve Read the rest of this entry »

Last week I had the pleasure of working with a wonderful people and pet photographer, Pauline Zonneveld, who booked time with me for a private consulting session to bring her vision of pairing encaustic and photography to life. She did her homework and  brought a variety of images she liked cut out from magazines. This gave us a good basis to start with and from there I helped Pauline decide on a process and we talked about how to start developing her own distinctive style.

I took Pauline through a couple of different ways to get a look similar to what she liked. She decided that image transfers would be the best route for her based on the equipment she already has, so we got to work.

Here’s what she came up with. This photo was taken right after Pauline did a great little dance saying “Yes, that’s exactly what I wanted!” Well done Pauline!

My August sessions are already booked but if you’d like to work with me in September or later check my website for ideas of what you might want to cover and how to register. This is ideal for artists who can’t make it to my regular workshops or those visiting the area who need to work within a specific schedule.

cls_private-pauline
BTW, Pauline is the photographer who took these amazing images of my 12 year old lab Sadie for her inspiring Good Old Dog Project.

Sadie   Sadie close up

When you mix colors do you tend to make nothing but mud? There’s a class for that! (and a quick tip below…)

On June 19 from 6 – 9 pm I’m hosting guest instructor and color expert Kimberly Kent in my Portland, Oregon studio to help you expand your painting palette while you develop your color sensibility.

Learn to mix, glaze and see color better. The exercises and techniques in this class will give you new tools for understanding how to mix just the color you need. You’ll work in encaustic paint in this class, but these concepts can be applied to color mixing in any medium. Find out more about my classes or register here.

How to Avoid Making Mud

Here’s a great example of the tips you’ll learn in this class: To avoid making mud, mix two primaries first. Once you get as close as you can to your desired color add the third primary. For example, mix yellow and blue to make green, then a touch of red to get the green you want. Just a few tips like this will have you mixing colors like a pro!

______________________________________

Linda Womack offers encaustic workshops in her Portland, Oregon studio as well as online encaustic classes at RobertsonWorkshops.com.

Last week I hosted a 5-day Wax Week Mixed Media workshop in my Portland, Oregon studio. I usually travel across the country offering this workshop at schools like Idyllwild Arts in California and Arrowmont School of Arts & Crafts in Tennessee, but I needed some time off from all the packing and unpacking so I invited students to come visit me this year.

Students from Washington, California, Colorado and Texas joined in the fun working with encaustic paint, paper, pastels, stamps, pigment sticks, inks, encaustic monotypes, wax scrolls and more! Here are a few photographs from the June session.

If you missed this Wax Week class you have another chance in August when the weather in Portland will be spectacular for a visit. Come join us!

Dawn adds texture and color to her panel

A few of the 5 foot long wax scrolls we created, Karen on left, Laura on right

Read the rest of this entry »

What a party! Last weekend there was a huge grand opening party at the eagerly awaited Mark Woolley Gallery where one of my paintings has already sold. Long time Portland art broker and gallerist Mark Woolley opened this new space as part of The Settlement galleries in Pioneer Place. For those of you were able to visit my “Spots of Time” show at People’s Art, Mark’s new gallery is on the same floor. Make sure you also have time to visit Place, another gallery on the same floor with a fantastic show this month (photos below).

Read the rest of this entry »

Songs Never Cease, 36 x 48, installed at Opus VII Gallery

I love a good art blog and Nancy Natale has got one. Nancy is a visual artist who works in several types of media including encaustic. We only see each other once a year or so at the International Encaustic Conference in Provincetown, but we keep up with each other through email, blogs and FaceBook. Last year she even bought one of my paintings at the conference.

Recently Nancy put out a call for an online exhibit called Art & Music, looking for art influenced by music and I’m happy to have my work included in the show. While choosing which piece to submit I started looking at my art in a new light which I think is a good indication of a strong curatorial theme. The show turned into a fascinating look at several artists work I hadn’t seen before, as well as a new view of my own work.

Here’s how Nancy introduced the show: “Listening to music while making art is a common practice in the studio. All that silence of solitude needs breaking up with melody and rhythm. It keeps us company, gets us singing and dancing, influences our moods and creeps into our art.”

I hope you’ll view the show and then take a look at your work in a new light. Does music influence your art?

______________________________________

Linda Robertson offers encaustic workshops in her Portland, Oregon studio as well as online encaustic classes at RobertsonWorkshops.com.

I recently received this wonderful note from a regular student in my online classes. Congratulations Jane!

“One of my encaustic collage pieces was just juried into a show at Artworks here in Richmond, so I wanted to let you know and thank you for the great online workshops……I used everything, including The Great Undo!* The skeletal leaf was brought into the house on the back of one of my dogs, so you just never know where you’ll get a collage element!”

Work by Jane Porter, a student in my online encaustic collage class

* The Great Undo is one of the lessons in my Encaustic Collage class which shows you how to quickly and easily remove parts of your encaustic painting that you don’t like. As you might imagine, it’s a VERY popular lesson.

I’m thrilled to make my big announcement — my new video workshops are now available online at RobertsonWorkshops.com!

Our online video classes bring an art teacher with international experience right into your studio. Work at your own pace, get personalized instruction, and interact with a community of like-minded artists. Best of all, every class is just $49 US with six months of access to videos and the class community.

I’ve been teaching in-person in my studio and around the country for years, but availability has always been limited to a handful of students per class. At the same time, so many of you have expressed interest in my workshops over the years with the regret that you live too far away to join me. To solve both of these problems my husband Bill and I decided to offer video classes, delivered online.

Here’s How it Works

  • All videos are available immediately so you can work at your own pace.
  • Your purchase gives you six months of access to the videos starting the moment you purchase the class.
  • The class includes an online forum where you can chat with the instructor and other students, share photos of your work in progress and post finished work.
  • The instructor will answer forum questions several times daily for the first 7 days of each month.
  • You’ll also benefit from discussions with all of the other students throughout the duration of the class.

For those of you who haven’t tried encaustic painting before the new web site even includes a free video on how to set up your own encaustic studio.

Join our mailing list to be notified when new classes are added (click link and look in right column).

Can you help me spread the word?

Please forward this link to a friend or two who you think might be interested. I’ve announced this on FaceBook and Twitter recently too, so if you see those posts please “like” them or retweet. Many thanks…

Those of you who read my blog on a regular basis know all about my previous visits to the John Campbell Folk School, so I won’t revisit the basics again. Instead I’ll focus on this amazing group of students brought together by my workshop there a few weeks ago. Wow, did we have fun! I’ve got several photos here for you to get an idea of how the workshop unfolded, and what wonderful friendships were forged.

captionDru and Louise had very different styles of working, but had a great time working together. Louise arrived in her big truck with just about everything under the sun so when we were missing something everyone asked, “Does Louise have it?” and she usually did. Thank goodness!

captionAnne and Susan taught wood turning instructor Jim about the basics of encaustic. Jim, along with several other instructors and students from other classes, stopped by to see what all the fuss was about and left with a copy of my book Embracing Encaustic in tow to get started at home.

Here is the whole class on the last day along with some of their favorite work. The photo was taken by our wonderful studio assistant Susi Hall who managed to avoid my camera!

This group was made up of extraordinary experimenters who tried hard to find new approaches to use with their wax. Check out some of their work:

Stacey made this wonderful piece with pins running through balls of wax that were scraped off of other paintings. It's a wonderful reminder that everything doesn't need to be flat!

Lynn brought in a ceramic panel that was bisque fired and added transparent wax to enhance the surface.

Ruth made this wonderful piece look like leather by combining wax, shellac and fabric.

Rodney is vision impaired and contacted me about it before class. I figured out that because I feel the wax as much as I look at it that we should be able to find a way for him to work in the medium. We did! This image uses an image transfer for the figures and the rest was done with a smaller paint brush and his little flashlight to help him see the brush detail as he painted. Nicely done!

Dru made this piece with a hand colored photograph glued to the board then covered with clear medium. I showed her how to use wax crayons and PanPastels on top of the wax for delicate surface details. Dru sold this piece to a student from another class during our show at the end of the week.

Anne worked with cigar boxes as bases for several of her pieces and come up with some interesting designs, a few of which looked like shrines.

We had a critique at the end of class where everyone was able to show off their favorite work in private before it went to the exhibit.

During class I mentioned that my dog, Sadie, needs surgery and I was very worried about her. Someone found a photo of her in my collage materials and everyone worked together on this painting of Sadie, wishing her a speedy recovery. It was such a sweet gesture that they made me cry. Thanks everyone!

The two funniest comments from the week:

1. That looks like a hamhock!

2. That girl ‘aint right.

Both said with a smile, and both well received. Yes, it was an extraordinary group, and it was my pleasure to be a part of it. 🙂

OK, here I am in Arizona and somehow my classes are already done! I taught Wax Image Transfers on Tuesday night and Beeswax Collage Basics all day yesterday. I had really fun students so the class time just flew by. Here are a few photos of the classes and the beautiful work my students created. Enjoy!

Click on any of the images above to see a larger version.

Most of these pieces were created with nothing but collage materials, stamps, pastels, and natural or clear beeswax, and many of the students had never even worked with wax before. Very impressive, don’t you think? Great work everyone!

This class sold out quickly so if you missed it you can still learn many of these techniques from my book, Embracing Encaustic: Learning to Paint with Beeswax (which is available to purchase online here), or come visit me in Oregon for a one or two day workshop in my private studio. You can view my full workshop schedule here.

Also, if any of you are planning to attend Art & Soul retreat in Oregon this fall, I can book workshops that are convenient to your class dates in Portland. Just contact me an let me know when you’ll be in town so we can make a plan that works for you.

I’m just about to wrap it up tonight as I have to get up at blark-o’clock in the morning to fly to Phoenix, Arizona where I’ll be teaching at Art Unraveled.

Jack is helping me pack for my trip
Here’s Jack helping me pack for my trip

I managed to get 107 pounds into my suitcases (not including the dog) which was a trick because i can only check 50. I’ll be carrying the rest in the biggest carry-ons allowed. Ugh. I sent one box ahead already, so that’s another 50 pounds or so. And that’s only for two classes!

My good friend and super talented artist Bridget Benton will be my assistant (thank goodness!) so the class is guaranteed to be fun. Oh, and just for laughs, it will be 105 degrees there. I’ll try to post from the retreat so you can enjoy the fun too.

Wow, what a busy weekend! We had a great book release party on Friday for Embracing Encaustic: Learning to Paint with Beeswax and lots of friends came by to wish us well. If you couldn’t make ti to the party here in Portland, here’s a taste of the fun.

My husband Bill was instrumental in getting this book to press so it was a real family celebration. We had books for sale at the party but they will be available to everyone else online by June 15. First we have the really BIG party at the National Encaustic Conference next week near Boston. I plan to blog about the conference most days I’m there, so watch this space for updates from the road. Read the rest of this entry »

We had our local International Encaustic Artists (IEA) meeting last night as the temperature reached almost 100 degrees. This is unusual for Portland and even stranger because I still have sweat pants in the wash from when I was so cold a couple of weeks ago!

Karl with his new work

We welcomed a new member, Karl, and enjoyed the work he shared with us. Judy Wise and Melinda Fellini gave us the scoop on the recent IEA retreat in Carmel while we tried to cool down with a nice beverage. I also shared the first copies of my book, Embracing Encaustic, which arrived the day before. Below is guest artist Andrea Benson reviewing her work in the book.

Andrea reviews her work in Embracing Encaustic

I have a few advance copies, but the bulk of the books have yet to arrive. It will officially debut at the National Encaustic Conference in Massachusetts on June 8, and by June 15 it will be available for purchase at www.embracingencaustic.com.

Our demo this month was by Susan Freedman who has a new stencil cutting tool we all wanted to try out. It’s made by Fiskars and makes cutting stencils with paper a snap! We we’re all duly impressed by how easy and accurate it is. I think what she had is an older version of the Ultra Shapexpress. It’s around $20 and from what I saw it will be worth every penny.

We were also delivering our work for the show Jim Talt arranged in Newberg next month at the Newberg Gallery (more on that soon!), so that spawned various impromptu critiques as the night wore on…

Read the rest of this entry »

Casey’s creationToday I had the pleasure of painting, laughing and playing with six wonderful women in my Tons of Texture class: Casey, Charmaine, Cynthia, Deanna, Kalynne and Jennifer. This is one of my new intermediate classes for those who have already gotten their hands dirty (or sticky?) with wax by taking a beginning encaustic class with me or any other teacher, or even experimenting on their own. The only requirement is that you already know how to paint on and fuse layers of wax so we can get right into the fun stuff without reviewing the basics. Check my web site for a full schedule of my upcoming classes, including Wax Image Transfers, Mixing Your Own Paint, more Tons of Texture classes, and in April I’ll add a new one: Working with Masks and Stencils.

Here’s peek into the fun we had today and the beautiful work that was created. Click on the smaller photos to see larger versions. The beautiful work above is by Casey.

casey Charmaine Cynthia Deanna

Cynthia’s work

Cynthia’s bird soars

Read the rest of this entry »

Join My Mailing List

Online Encaustic Classes



RobertsonWorkshops.com online video classes bring Linda Robertson, an art teacher with international experience, right into your studio. Work at your own pace and watch the videos as many times as you want for a whole year.

Categories

My Books: Embracing Encaustic Series

There are now two books under the Embracing Encaustic title, Learning to Paint with Beeswax and the new title Advanced Techniques for Mixing Media, each focusing on specific encaustic techniques. Between the two books there are a total of 70 artists who share their work, reveal their personal painting methods and explain why they are compelled to make the work they do.Find out more and purchase them online here.

Embracing Encaustic: Learning to Paint with Beeswax
By Linda Robertson

Archives

Follow Me on Twitter