You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Portland’ category.

cls_photo-pastel-skyline

Wax Weekend workshop: Photo Encaustic

cls_landscapes-rocks-72

Luminous Landscapes

Every year I hear from more artists who are combining their travel plans with learning new art techniques. A couple of years ago I had people from 4 different countries in one of my classes, and since I only take 6 students at a time that’s pretty impressive!

This year in addition to my five-day Wax Week intensive workshops, I’m also offering a few two- and three-day Wax Weekend sessions that focus on a particular theme including Luminous Landscapes, Photo Encaustic and my brand-new Secret Messages class.

Wax Weekends (2-3 days)
5/19-5/21: Photo Encaustic
6/24-6/25: Luminous Landscapes
7/7-7/9: Secret Messages

cls_secret-messages-couple-detail

Secret Messages

Wax Week (5 days)
8/2-8/6: Textured Landscapes

One of the most exciting things about working with encaustic are the unusual textures you can add to your paintings, so for this year’s Wax Week class I’m offering something new called Textured Landscapes. It’s a radical extension of my shorter Luminous Landscapes class. This 5-day intensive workshop combines some of my most popular classes with some brand new techniques that will keep you creating new work for years to come.

In this class we’ll focus on creating Textured Landscapes using encaustic with a wide variety of materials including textured gesso, watercolor, pigment sticks, and photo transfers. We’ll use whatever media we need to create your vision, and working in small groups in my studio makes that possible. I hope you’ll join me in Oregon soon!

cls_textured-landscape-alma-SpringhillRd

Wax Week workshop: Textured Landscapes

______________________________________

Linda Robertson is a painter and the author of the Embracing Encaustic book series. She offers live encaustic workshops in her Portland, Oregon studio as well as online encaustic classes.

Many artists need time alone in order to focus enough to get their work done. While I consider myself very sociable, even I think twice before I go to an art event because it’s still time away from my studio. It’s fine to have your alone time, but I want to encourage all of you to get out of your studios and go visit with other artists whenever you can! Local art events offer an easy way to visit many studios in a short period of time, so that would be a good place to start.

We just had a big one here in Oregon, called Portland Open Studios, and I was happy to visit with a number of artists I’ve never met before as well as those I try to visit regularly. I often post photos from my studio visits on my Facebook timeline.

My Facebook posting about Randall's work

At every studio I try to ask other visitors “what was your favorite stop so far?” This year several people mentioned Randall David Tipton. I hadn’t heard of before so on the list he went and boy am I glad of it! Read the rest of this entry »

I’m proud to have an article in the current issue of Encaustic Arts Magazine called “Creating and Embracing New Opportunities” which tells the story of how my book, Embracing Encaustic, led to many more new opportunities including my online encaustic classes at RobertsonWorkshops.com.

Here’s an excerpt: “As the huge truck pulled up in front of my house I got a chill up my spine. I knew the books would arrive sometime that week but no one seemed to want to give me a firm delivery date. I watched as the driver struggled to maneuver the bulky pallet through my garden gate and I worried that it wouldn’t fit. As he drove away, leaving me with box after box of my new encaustic book I thought, not for the first time, “What have I done?”

It all started about 5 years ago when one of my students mentioned that she couldn’t find an encaustic book with step-by-step instructions for beginners. That got me thinking that it wouldn’t be too hard to put one together, especially with the new print-on-demand services that had recently become available for self-publishing books online. Using this service they would be printed as they were purchased, so I would never need to print a large number of books. By that evening I had decided which service to use, downloaded the software and purchased the Internet domain name Embracing Encaustic.”

Read the whole article online. It’s a very inspiring magazine, so please share it with your friends!

When you mix colors do you tend to make nothing but mud? There’s a class for that! (and a quick tip below…)

On June 19 from 6 – 9 pm I’m hosting guest instructor and color expert Kimberly Kent in my Portland, Oregon studio to help you expand your painting palette while you develop your color sensibility.

Learn to mix, glaze and see color better. The exercises and techniques in this class will give you new tools for understanding how to mix just the color you need. You’ll work in encaustic paint in this class, but these concepts can be applied to color mixing in any medium. Find out more about my classes or register here.

How to Avoid Making Mud

Here’s a great example of the tips you’ll learn in this class: To avoid making mud, mix two primaries first. Once you get as close as you can to your desired color add the third primary. For example, mix yellow and blue to make green, then a touch of red to get the green you want. Just a few tips like this will have you mixing colors like a pro!

______________________________________

Linda Womack offers encaustic workshops in her Portland, Oregon studio as well as online encaustic classes at RobertsonWorkshops.com.

What a week! It’s true that events in December tend to clump and overlap, looking for just the right day to stand out from the crowd, but last week was one of the busiest I’ve had in a while. I had art openings on 3 consecutive days, with lots of art and excitement to go around.

Portland Visual Art Exchange

Lisa Kaser, Tuque, wax & felt

Lisa Kaser, Tuque, wax & felt

I was thrilled to be invited again this year to the 6th Annual Portland Visual Art Exchange. A big thanks to Becca Bernstein, Sally Finch, TJ Norris and all their volunteers for all of their hard work!

Over 50 artists were invited to exhibit one piece of original work in a week-long, invitational show hosted at the Littman Gallery at Portland State University (PSU). The exhibit culminated in an art trade and public reception where the participating artists went home proud new collectors from some of the most talented artists in Portland.

I was thrilled to receive a wax and felt sculpture by Lisa Kaser, and my work went home with Bill LePore, Chair of the Art Department and Professor of Art at PSU.

Oakridge Park Opening

Four of my paintings are featured in the third floor lobby of Oakridge Park

Shadows Reveal, 36 x 48, Encaustic on panel

We celebrated the opening of Oakridge Park last week with 45 new apartments serving Lake Oswego area seniors who earn modest incomes. This is my second project with Northwest Housing Alternatives (NHA) who provide a wide range of affordable housing  options and have the foresight to include original art by local artists in many of their projects. I’m honored to work with them through Kent Art Brokers.

The Big 200 Art Show


One of my 10 paintings for The Big 200

A big thanks to Chris Haberman and and Jason Brown for inviting me to be in The Big 200 Art Show (formerly The Big 100), hosted by People’s Art of Portland. I’m guessing that name may change again as there were over 250 artists by last count and over 2,500 art work available at the show.

Invited artists are each given 10 small wood panels and let loose to create whatever they like, knowing that all panels will sell for just $40 each in order to allow just about anyone to afford an original piece of art. This is an exciting show because when the art is hung there are no names included with the work which evens the playing field. Art from a very well known artist may be sitting right  next to that of someone in their first art show, but all you need to care about is DO YOU LIKE THE WORK? I love this idea. The show was absolutely packed and my husband and I came home with 4 beautiful new paintings, all by artists who are new to us. The show is up through January 10 so check it out if you can!

One of my panels in place on the BIG wall, middle row, second from right

I taught my Encaustic & Photography class last weekend in my Oregon studio and had the pleasure of working with 3 amazing photographers who made beautiful work. None of them had much (if any) experience with encaustic but here is a small portion of what they were able to create in just two days:


This photograph by Lara Blair was already a beauty, but when she cut out the horse and made her own sky with the encaustic paint the movement was highlighted dramatically. As a great example of the sculptural properties of the wax, the mane of the horse is raised slightly, giving the painting more dimension.


This collage, also by Lara Blair, is a combination of photographs on different weights of paper and some faux gold leaf around the top edges.


The work above is by Sandra Nykerk who traveled all the way from Gardiner Montana for this class.  This image of a rock within a rock was printed on tissue paper then highlighted with pastels. It’s a shame how hard it is to photograph encaustic, and I didn’t do this piece justice. It’s so luminous!


This work is by Maro Vandorou. She rarely works with color so the image above is an exception and the one below is more similar to the rest of her work. In the photo of the roses, we poured the wax over the surface of the photograph instead of painting on layers of wax. That gives the image a dreamy feel and a perfectly smooth surface that is very enticing.

Maro’s self portrait was made on tissue paper and adhered to a board with wax, letting much of the clear medium show through.

If you’d like to join me for an Encaustic & Photography class, check the schedule online anytime at http://www.embracingencaustic.com/workshops/. If you can’t get to Oregon to see me I’ll come to your studio via my online classes. Check them out at http://www.womackworkshops.com.

I’m thrilled to make my big announcement — my new video workshops are now available online at RobertsonWorkshops.com!

Our online video classes bring an art teacher with international experience right into your studio. Work at your own pace, get personalized instruction, and interact with a community of like-minded artists. Best of all, every class is just $49 US with six months of access to videos and the class community.

I’ve been teaching in-person in my studio and around the country for years, but availability has always been limited to a handful of students per class. At the same time, so many of you have expressed interest in my workshops over the years with the regret that you live too far away to join me. To solve both of these problems my husband Bill and I decided to offer video classes, delivered online.

Here’s How it Works

  • All videos are available immediately so you can work at your own pace.
  • Your purchase gives you six months of access to the videos starting the moment you purchase the class.
  • The class includes an online forum where you can chat with the instructor and other students, share photos of your work in progress and post finished work.
  • The instructor will answer forum questions several times daily for the first 7 days of each month.
  • You’ll also benefit from discussions with all of the other students throughout the duration of the class.

For those of you who haven’t tried encaustic painting before the new web site even includes a free video on how to set up your own encaustic studio.

Join our mailing list to be notified when new classes are added (click link and look in right column).

Can you help me spread the word?

Please forward this link to a friend or two who you think might be interested. I’ve announced this on FaceBook and Twitter recently too, so if you see those posts please “like” them or retweet. Many thanks…

I’m almost unpacked and organized from the encaustic conference and need to now turn my full attention back to my biggest project of the year, the show I’m curating in Oregon called Luminous Layers: Exploring Contemporary Encaustic.

There was a nice article in the Oregonian this morning by Jan Goetze to kick things off as well as a TV commercial that will be airing on KATU this week. We start installing the show on Monday so I’ll try to post some photos of the process as we go.

There will be exhibit tours and artist demonstrations each of the three days, as well as a panel discussion on Friday, June 25, at 7:30 pm. “Why Wax? How Encaustic Informs Our Art” will feature artists Jeff Schaller, Cari Hernandez, and Kanaan Kanaan with moderator Andrea Benson. (Lakewood Center for the Arts, $5) You can see the festival program online to help you plan your weekend. I hope to see you there!

Photo by Brent Wojahn/The Oregonian

Are you interested in meeting with other encaustic artists to share ideas and learn more about this fascinating medium? Here’s a great opportunity for you to join a new encaustic club forming in Portland. I’m not running the group, just trying to help Liz and Linda get the word out about it.

Who?
The organizers are Liz McDonald and Linda Marple, avid amateurs and students of Portland encaustic teacher Linda Womack.

Why?
To meet with other encaustic artists for critiques and problem-solving, show and tell, and possibly assignments to explore specific techniques or themes. Group ordering of supplies to cut down on costs. The group will be open to ideas from participants. The goal is to share and learn.

Where?
The club meets once a month. Please contact Liz to find out the next location if you’d like to attend.

Working in Wax lecture at 23 Sandy Gallery in Portland, OR

Working in Wax lecture at 23 Sandy Gallery in Portland, OR

My lecture on “Working in Wax” was well attended Saturday night despite the nasty flu bug sweeping Portland this month. “Working in Wax” offered a rich visual introduction to the history, tools and techniques of encaustic painting, along with an overview of contemporary artists working in this ancient medium.

Breaking Through, By Gregory Wright

Breaking Through, By Gregory Wright

Several artists from my book, “Embracing Encaustic: Learning to Paint with Beeswax,” were featured along with internationally recognized encaustic painters. A full list of the artists profiled is available, along with links to their web sites. Many thanks to all the artists who allowed me to share their work!

Nancy Azara, Andrea Bird, Elena De La Ville, Mary Farmer, Kevin Frank,
Eileen P. Goldenberg, Jane Guthridge, Thea Haubrich, Cari Hernandez, Lisa Kaser, Deborah Kapoor, Phyllis Lashe, Mari Marks (Mari Marks Fleming), Alexandre Masino, Catherine Nash, David Price, Scott Reilly, Josie Rodriguez, Paula Roland, Amy Royce, Jeff Schaller, Julie Shaw Lutts, Randall Steeves, Linda Womack, Deanna Wood, Gregory Wright, Kari J. Young

Gin, By Jeff Schaller

Gin, By Jeff Schaller

Following the lecture there was a screening of Sister Bee, a lyrical short documentary about six women beekeepers who encounter startling beauty and spiritual truth in their work with honeybees. The film was wildly popular evoking both laughter and sighs from the enthusiastic audience. A special thanks to filmmaker Laura Tyler for allowing me to share her inspiring film.

Pablo and Brownie, By Lisa Kaser

Pablo and Brownie, By Lisa Kaser

Last Christmas we posted video greetings as soon as three snowflakes fell. This year we are totally snowed in with the most snow Portland has seen in 40 years! So far we’ve gotten at least 14 inches of snow over 3 days, with 5 – 8 more expected before Christmas.

Yes, the snow is up to my knees! Doesn't it look like I lost my dog in the snow?

Yes, the snow is up to my knees! Doesn't it look like I lost my dog in the snow?

Depending on who you ask, people are referring to this storm as the Snowpocolypse or Stormzilla, but either way it’s a big one. Take a look…

Join me at 23 Sandy Gallery on February 7, 2009 for Working in Wax. This lecture will be a rich visual introduction to the history, tools and techniques of encaustic painting, along with an overview of contemporary artists working in this ancient medium. I’ll share images of several of my paintings as they were being created, showing some of the steps involved in building up the layers of wax and other media.

There will also be a screening of Sister Bee, a lyrical and beautiful documentary about six women beekeepers who encounter startling beauty and spiritual truth in their work with honeybees (Running time 30 minutes). Tickets are $10 and are available in my studio or by mail. Limited to 25 people.

Unidentified wax chunks washed up on the beach

Unidentified wax chunks washed up on the beach

On the northern Oregon Coast, near the mouth of the Nehalem River, beeswax chunks, other cargo, and even parts of a ship have been turning up over the past two centuries. Is this a lost Spanish galleon from the 17th Century? My buddy from high school, Scott Williams, is the Washington state archaeologist working on the project and he thinks it is. When I last visited him he showed me chunks of wax…or something…that had washed up on the beach that they were trying to identify.

Oregon Field Guide recently aired a story on the project that I thought you all might find fascinating. Enjoy! View the video here.

beeswax-wreck-opb

I also found a second video online from The Archaeology Channel:

View this video

This is just a short post to share with your the first seeds of my new series, tentatively called Continuum. I started the first piece before the National Encaustic conference and have been working on new pieces since my return. I’m calling it Continuum because the series reflects the gradual growth of my work as well as the philosophy behind it.

I was inspired to start this series after realizing that so many things in life cycle back and show up again and again; certain dates, numbers, patterns and rhythms that catch my notice. These are marks in the history of time which have always been there and will be there long after we are gone. But enough of that for now, let’s get visual.

This one started it all. Continuum #1 (Diptych), 13″ x 27″, Encaustic and mixed media

Continuum #2, 11″ x 11″, Encaustic and mixed media

Continuum #3, 14″ x 13″, Encaustic and mixed media

Continuum #4, 13″ x 13″, Encaustic and mixed media

Continuum #5, 13″ x 13″, Encaustic and mixed media

Continuum #6, 13″ x 13″, Encaustic and mixed media

As you can see I’m working small until I get warmed up, then I’ll start working larger. My 20″ x 30″ and 24″ x 24″ panels should be ready by tomorrow, so I’ll start those soon. Eventually I’d like to get to a few 48″ panels. If you have any comments I’d love to hear them. I’m really excited by this new work and feel like I’m off on a great new adventure!

Take a look at the wonderful article in The Oregonian Arts & Entertainment section today titled, “Artful lives, on view.” I’m one of a few artists profiled for the Mt. Tabor Art Walk next weekend!

The Oregonian reporter, Inara Verzemnieks came by just after I finished teaching a class on Sunday and we had a wonderful time chatting about art. She even sent a photographer to take some photographs.

Hollywood Invasion!

Also, this just in for star spotting during the art walk: The Road, the film version of Cormac McCarthy’s Pulitzer Prize winning novel, starring Viggo Mortensen and Charlize Theron (and they will be there), will be filming in our neighborhood at Yamhill & 56th on the weekend of the Mt. Tabor Art Walk. They’ll be filming from early morning on through to midnight so you’ll still have plenty of time for art!

Join My Mailing List

Online Encaustic Classes



RobertsonWorkshops.com online video classes bring Linda Robertson, an art teacher with international experience, right into your studio. Work at your own pace and watch the videos as many times as you want for a whole year.

Categories

My Books: Embracing Encaustic Series

There are now two books under the Embracing Encaustic title, Learning to Paint with Beeswax and the new title Advanced Techniques for Mixing Media, each focusing on specific encaustic techniques. Between the two books there are a total of 70 artists who share their work, reveal their personal painting methods and explain why they are compelled to make the work they do.Find out more and purchase them online here.

Embracing Encaustic: Learning to Paint with Beeswax
By Linda Robertson

Archives

Follow Me on Twitter