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I’m proud to have an article in the current issue of Encaustic Arts Magazine called “Creating and Embracing New Opportunities” which tells the story of how my book, Embracing Encaustic, led to many more new opportunities including my online encaustic classes at WomackWorkshops.com.

Here’s an excerpt: “As the huge truck pulled up in front of my house I got a chill up my spine. I knew the books would arrive sometime that week but no one seemed to want to give me a firm delivery date. I watched as the driver struggled to maneuver the bulky pallet through my garden gate and I worried that it wouldn’t fit. As he drove away, leaving me with box after box of my new encaustic book I thought, not for the first time, “What have I done?”

It all started about 5 years ago when one of my students mentioned that she couldn’t find an encaustic book with step-by-step instructions for beginners. That got me thinking that it wouldn’t be too hard to put one together, especially with the new print-on-demand services that had recently become available for self-publishing books online. Using this service they would be printed as they were purchased, so I would never need to print a large number of books. By that evening I had decided which service to use, downloaded the software and purchased the Internet domain name Embracing Encaustic.”

Read the whole article online. It’s a very inspiring magazine, so please share it with your friends!

CALL FOR ENCAUSTIC ART: Juried by Wendy Aikin and Daniella Woolf, WAX hopes to introduce the public to the diversity of methods and techniques currently employed by contemporary encaustic artists. Two and three-dimensional work will be considered. Show is at the Pajaro Valley Arts Council in Watsonville, CA. Deadline 2/3/12.

Upon A Singing Wind, 24" x 24", Encaustic, oil, fabric, foil

Usually the show comes first, and then the catalog. This time the process happened in reverse beginning with Daniella Woolf’s book called Encaustic with a Textile Sensibility which featured 4 of my paintings. This “gallery between pages” showcases the work of more than 20 artists from the US and Canada who paint in encaustic with techniques often used in printed textiles or woven cloth. That book is the basis for this unique exhibit.

Kimball Art Center
Park City, Utah
June 4 – July 31, 2011

My work, Upon A Singing Wind, was started while a friend was in hospice and finished shortly after he died. My work often reflects on the residue of our lives and what impressions are left after we are gone. In this case the frayed fabric pieces were the perfect material to  represent how my friend was slowly untethering from this world. After he passed I added the last bit of fabric to signify his departure from a life well lived. Though we will miss him,  the image is meant to be seen as more joy than sorrow, with all the chaos of this world far below his newly released spirit.

I’m honored to have my work in such amazing company, alongside several artists I’ve admired for years. If you’re in the area I hope you’ll be sure to see the show.

Daniella Woolf's "Turkish Delight" installation gave viewers a chance to interact with some wax.

Daniella Woolf's "Turkish Delight" installation was a big hit, giving viewers a chance to interact with some of the art.

It’s hard to believe the Luminous Layers: Exploring Contemporary Encaustic exhibit is over already, after all those months of planning, but I’m happy to report that it was a great success! We had steady, enthusiastic crowds who were ready to buy art, so both artists and patrons left happy.

Here’s a video of the exhibit along with some photos below. The video is a little shaky at times since I hadn’t slept much the week prior, but it will give you a good flavor of the work in the show.

Jeff Schaller gives an impromptu interview to a local TV station

Jeff Schaller gives an impromptu interview to a local TV station

Jeff Schaller, Breathe, 36" x 36"

Jeff Schaller, Breathe, 36" x 36"

Our two featured artists illustrated the variety of ways in which the wax can be used for self expression. Jeff Schaller paints edgy pop inspired images that are provocative and whimsical, adding words and language to propel the viewer into scenes of seemingly unrelated subjects.

Cari Hernandez takes a different approach, where encaustic is the connective medium in her abstract, sculptural works which often rely on the use of shadow and light. For Hernandez, combining mediums such as wax, paper, resin and fiber serves as a way to explore themes of faith, courage, joy, and pleasure. I was pleased to also include an additional 60 talented artists who were either invited or juried into this comprehensive show. Look for video of the show to be added soon!

Cari Hernandez, Lovely Bed, 18" x 24"

Cari Hernandez, Lovely Bed, 18" x 24"

We had a slide show running throughout the show with scenes of artist's studios to give the viewers a more personal connection to the artists

We had slides running throughout the show with scenes of artist's studios to give the viewers a more personal connection to the work

In keeping with the educational mission of the Lake Oswego Festival of the Arts, there was an extensive roster demonstrations throughout the event. Artists from across the United States shared their knowledge of encaustic, introducing this ancient art to a very appreciative audience.

Brenda Mallory was one of 15 artists who demonstrated how they works with wax.

Brenda Mallory was one of 15 artists who demonstrated how she works with wax.

We owe a big thanks to our demo sponsors, Muse Art + Design (who recently launched EncausticSupplies.com, R&F Handmade Paints and Enkaustikos! Wax Art. These companies are always generous supporters of the encaustic community, especially with educational events, and I can’t thank them enough for their support.

We had standing room only for every demo, where many patrons had never heard of encaustic before

We had standing room only for every demo, where many patrons had never heard of encaustic before

There were 167 works from 65 artists in the United States and Canada, including artists who were invited to participate and those who were juried into the show. Awards were presented in several categories:

Curator Award, Gregory Wright, Beckoning, 20" x 16"

Curator Award, Gregory Wright, Beckoning, 20" x 16"

Juror Award, Mari Marks, Sedimentary Series, Terra X, 48" x36"

Juror Award, Mari Marks, Sedimentary Series, Terra X, 48" x36"

Juror Award, Dave Laubenthal, Gropious (mandala), 24" x 24"

Juror Award, Dave Laubenthal, Gropious (mandala), 24" x 24"

Juror Award, Karen Frey, Richard, 14" x 18"

Juror Award, Karen Frey, Richard, 14" x 18"

Co-Chair Award, Kevin Frank, Oranges with Yellow Pitcher, 20" x 26"

Chair's Choice Award, Kevin Frank, Oranges with Yellow Pitcher, 20" x 26"

Co-Chair Award, Brenda Mallory, Explosion in Gold, 15" x 15"

Chair's Choice Award, Brenda Mallory, Explosion in Gold, 15" x 15"

Committee Award, Judith Williams, Endless Swirls, 26" x 20"

Committee Award, Judith Williams, Endless Swirls, 26" x 20"

Committee Award, Liz McDonald, Big Blue Ball, 12" x 9"

Committee Award, Liz McDonald, Big Blue Ball, 12" x 9"

 Committee Award, Karl Kaiser, Red Petals, 18" x 18". This same work also won the Patron's Choice Award.

Committee Award, Karl Kaiser, Red Petals, 18" x 18". This same work also won the Patron's Choice Award.

Panelist Kanaan Kanaan discusses how he brings together his two cultures within his work with wax

Panelist Kanaan Kanaan discusses how he brings together his two disparate cultures within his work with wax

As a special part of the show we enjoyed a panel discussion on “Why Wax? How Encaustic Informs Our Art,” featuring artists Jeff Schaller, Cari Hernandez, and Kanaan Kanaan with moderator Andrea Benson. They had a  lively discussion on the challenges and unique qualities of working in encaustic, and why they are drawn to the medium.

Cari Hernandez discusses the allure of working with wax during the panel discussion

Cari Hernandez discusses the allure of working with wax during the panel discussion

As the show curator, I can confidently say that Luminous Layers achieved the goal we set out at the beginning — to show the wide variety of ways in which contemporary artists are using wax in their art today.

This show wouldn’t have happened if not for my very dedicated team who worked tirelessly to help me pull it all together: Kimberly Kent, Natasia Chan and Amy Stoner as well as numerous committee members from the Lake Oswego Festival including Lisa Strout, Marabee Bertelsen, Diane Englert and Andrew Edwards. Thank you everyone!

First Proof Pages for Embracing Encaustic

I received the first press proofs of my revised book yesterday and they looked better than I ever imagined! The resolution is so good that you can see brush strokes in many of the works and the color is brilliant. I was especially interested in seeing the work of my 25 guest artists, as those are all new to this edition of the book.

Here’s a list of the guest artists who will be included in the Embracing Encaustic: Learning to Paint with Beeswax:

Elizabeth BackEmbracing Encaustic Cover
Janet Bartlett Goodman
Andrea Benson
Natasia Chan
Linda Cordner
Mary Farmer
Kevin Frank
Amber Geroge
Eileen Goldenberg
Diana Gonzalez Gandolfi
Bridgette Guerzon Mills
Jeff Juhlin
Kimberly Kent
Scott Reilly
Sue Roberts
Paula Roland
Marybeth Rothman
Tracy Spadafora
Amy Stoner
Alicia Tormey
Elise Wagner
Judith Williams
Judy Wise
Daniella Woolf
Gregory Wright

In addition to sharing their work in the book, each artist also shares some insight into how the work was created, often sharing surprising tips and tricks along the way. I think this is my favorite aspect of the new edition. These artists have been so generous in sharing their knowledge! To view more work by each of these artists visit www.embracingencaustic.com for links to their web sites.

I’m expecting the books to arrive by the end of May. I’ll announce it on this blog when they are available for purchase!

My friend Brenda Boyd was nice enough to send me a great link I’d like to share. I purchased the September/October issue of Fiber Arts Magazine when it first came out because my friend Daniella Woolf was profiled in it along with several other encaustic artists. What I didn’t realize is that you can sneak a peek into it online (or order this terrific issue for just $7): http://www.fiberarts.com/back_issues/09_07/sampling.asp

 

Lorraine Glessner, Seed, 12 x 12 inches

Hot Stuff show openingThe artist profiled online, Lorraine Glessner, does stunning work as shown above. She was part of the Hot Stuff exhibit I was in at the National Encaustic Conference last year and I can attest that her work is even more beautiful in person.

This year’s conference takes place in early June and I was honored that Joanne Mattera asked me to do a demonstration on painting with masks and hold a book signing. I’ll post more on that later. Maybe I’ll see you there!

Hot StuffThis virtual gallery is for all of those artists not able to attend the First National Encaustic Conference and accompanying gallery show, Hot Stuff.

The range of the work was impressive, with everything from works on paper to sculpture represented, including traditional and experiments styles. I attended the show twice and still didn’t get enough time with these amazing pieces of art! Enjoy.

** To see more posts about the 2007 conference go here. **

1b Gwen Plunkett 3 5 8 Alexandre Masino 19 20 21a 23 Lissa Rankin 25 27 Mari Marks Linda Womack, Remiains of the Earth, 12 x 12 inches Miles Conrad, Explorer, Encaustic, Rubber Bands, Wire on Panel Daniella Woolf, Spina 30, 30 x 30 inches, sewn paper encaustic Ed Angell, Homage to M.L., 12″ X 12″ X 4 3/4 inches, Beeswax and Lead Debra Ramsay, Alone Together, 24 x 24 inces, encaustic and eggshell inlay on birch panel Debra Ramsay, Measuring Parallels #7, 24 x 24 inches, encaustic and eggshell inlay on birch panel Jeff Schaller, Closed, 24 x 24 inches, encaustic Jeff Schaller, Flashbulbs, 24 x 24 inches, encaustic Kristin Swenson-Lintault, Vital, 12 x 12 inches, Encaustic, oil stick, string on Masonite Lorraine Glessner, Seed, 12 x 12 inches Lorraine Glessner, Refraction, 12 x 12 inches David Hazlett, Lime Wedge, 9 1/2 x 10 1/2 inches Lorrie Fredette, Pores, 6 x 3″, encaustic and interfacing Lorrie Fredette, Preservation #2 & #3, 23 x 24 X 6, encaustic and interfacing Diana Gonzales-Gandolfi Sandra Quinn Alexandre Masino, Conquis par cette lumi, Encaustic on board, 16″ x 23″ Alexandre Masino, Culte diurne, Encaustic on board, 16″ x 23″ Julie Shaw Lutts, Journey, 12″ x 12″ on wood panel Kim Bernard, Nautilus, encaustic on terra cotta, 3” x 15” x 15″ Kim Bernard, Asclepias Scattered, encaustic on terra cotta, 3” x 10” x 20”

Please note: I lost my notes with the artists and titles so I’m adding in the info for what I have, numbering the rest of the works (view the number or artist’s name by moving your cursor the image). Also, I wasn’t able to photograph all of the work, so if you were represented in the show and I’ve missed yours (or ended up with a bad photo!) please send me an image and I’ll add it here. If your work is here and you’d like me to post the details, please send them to me along with the number it goes with.

Hot Stuff show opening

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My Book: Embracing Encaustic

Embracing Encaustic, will teach you how to paint and collage with wax using step-by-step instructions accompanied by 90+ full color photographs. Find out more or purchase it online here.

Embracing Encaustic: Learning to Paint with Beeswax
By Linda Robertson Womack

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